Cautious Kids

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Some of the most important lessons we can teach our young ones are safety guidelines and how to approach dangerous situations when unattended. When children approach the age of 3 years they become very impressionable and are suitable for learning some important life lessons. This is the idea time to start teaching them some basic safety rules.

Hazards at Home

Hazards involving intense heat can cause many injuries to children every year, this is often because they are unaware of all potential dangers in their own home. Hazards such as a boiling kettle, hot radiators, lit ovens and fireplaces can all cause injuries to unsuspecting children. Little ones are particularly explorative when unsupervised to be sure they have a safe area to play in when they are left with time to themselves. Putting safety measures in place around your home is a good way of reducing the risk of children getting injured, but teaching them to be cautious themselves is an invaluable lesson that could make a large difference when they stumble across a shiny hazard without parental supervision.

Travelling Alone and Dealing With Strangers

As children reach the age in which they go to play with friends and make short journeys to and from nearby houses and shops, it’s vital that they know the importance of travelling safely and not to engage in conversation with any unfamiliar faces. Ensure they have a safe route to all destinations and remain in public view the entire time. If possible they should travel with groups of their friends to ensure they are not alone while travelling home.

The potential danger involved with a child engaging strangers is something no parent wants to think about, but ensuring your child knows when someone is clearly bad news can make a huge difference in the way they approach strangers.

Environmental Hazards

As children grown older and are approaching high school, they are always more likely to travel further out to play with friends, ride bikes and play sports, but there are important lessons they must learn about environmental hazards. An unsupervised reservoir may seem like an idea place to play and swim to a group of children, if they are uneducated on this topic they may be unaware of generally how difficult it becomes to clamber back out again once wet.

Pylons may appear to be giant climbing frames with which to play and show off to friends, but children may not know about the tens of thousands of volts flowing through the pylons electrical system. It is vital that children learn lessons such as these at a young age; a sensible child is much more likely to stay safe when left alone and can have a positive impact on their more troublesome friends.

Written by Daniel Travis – Brown on behalf of Gray & Co Criminal Defence Solicitors , follow him on Twitter @DanTravisBrown

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Six Safety Tips for Teens Travelling Abroad

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Teen travel is a booming industry. Shopping, friends and travel are all on a teen’s list of top priorities. How high is safety on that list?

You may have seen the movies “Hostel 1 & 2” and “Taken.” Is it horror at its worst or a glimpse into the potential problems teens may face when traveling abroad? Sure, these movies are a lot scarier than teen travel and you probably laughed at the reference, but safety is no joke.

Passport Safety

Does a traveling teen know about passport safety tips? A passport should always be on your person. True, many European hotels and hostels require you leave your passport at the front desk, whether you are checking-in or leaving the property for the day or evening. Make several complete copies of your passport prior to leaving home…in color if possible.

Leave a copy of your passport at home with family or friends, pack one in your suitcase (which you can carry with you as you sight-see abroad) and, if possible, a copy with a traveling companion or tour leader.

Know Your Rights

As a citizen of the United States, you have certain rights when you travel abroad. A United States Consulate, in the country where you travel, is where you need to seek help if you find yourself in trouble or if your passport goes missing.

Phone Calling Tips

Dialing abroad is slightly different from domestic calls. Learn the international phone dialing code, as well the particular country code of the area. You should also learn how to call your home numbers from the specific countries visited.

Know the Culture

You will want to do some research on the country you are planning to visit. Know the location of the US Consulate, and be aware of any peculiar laws you may accidentally find yourself challenging. This is especially true of Eastern Europe and the Middle East. To avoid unnecessary trouble abroad, remember that what we generally consider fun and games at home may cost you some headaches when traveling.

Safety in Numbers

Always try to stay together when out for the night. Walking in a strange city, at night can be dangerous enough. If you add alcohol or partying to the mix, you may be opening yourself up unnecessary harm when taking a short cut down a wrong alley, for example.

Watch for Crime

There are so many tricks and frauds, to be aware of when traveling. A common trick involves one person lingering at one end of a street who sends a signal to another person on the next block, indicating you are a good target for harm or theft. Another good example is Italy, where pick pocketing is an art form

Following a few guidelines can make the difference between a fun trip and a frightening brush with danger. By traveling smart, teens can have a truly memorable gap year and enjoy their time away from home.

 

Jessica Bosari writes blogs and articles for AdventuresCrossCountry, a site that helps teens and young adults find teen camps and gap year programs.

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