Dirk Monseur Violated Laws For Sex Offenders

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A sex offender that was arrested before has been arrested again in Charlotte North Carolina for not complying with the terms of sex offender laws. Dirk Walker Monseur, Jr. (Dirk Monseur), 34, violated the terms put in place for sex offenders by helping a team consisting of children six to eight years old.

The felony arrest happened at Granite Falls Park after parents said he volunteered to help the parents of the children with a normal practice session. Sex offenders are not allowed to be around children following a conviction in the state.

Though Monseur is not the father of any of the children, he allegedly has a relationship with at least three of the young players’ mothers.

Monseur previously served a 2 1/2 year prison term for not complying with sex offender laws because he failed to sign the registered offenders list. This infraction may get him more jail time, there is no sign of him violating any of the children.

However, North Carolina does not take that into consideration. The laws in North Carolina prohibit any registered sex offender to be on the premises of any place that has to do with minors.

The observer reports this includes any place that minors may come together for social events, recreational events or educational program. It makes sense to say Monseur’s helping a youth team classifies as such a place.

Parents are now for certain their kids are safe. If a parent is unsure about someone in their area, they can do an offenders search online. A basic offenders search is  free of charge.

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3 Basic Ways To Help Keep Your Child Internet Safe

These days, as a parent, it’s often the case that your children know more about the internet and computers than you do. But it’s still your duty as a parent or guardian to protect their experiences online. While there is legislation in place that requires children to get a parents permission before giving out sensitive information like address and phone number, among other things. But that doesn’t always happen – so just as with pretty much everything else with your child – it doesn’t hurt to be proactive.

What follows is some basic advice for making sure that the internet experience of your younger child is safe and secure (and they don’t inadvertently end up charging your credit cards a ton of money).

Become Computer Literate Yourself

It is still your job as a parent to make sure that your child’s experience online is safe and secure – but how can you do that if your kid needs to show you how to change the internet settings on your computer? If you aren’t too tech-savvy, enroll in a class at the local community college or high school. You’re going to want to make sure you are able to know how to:

  • Set up a separate “profile” on your computer for each child, with only you as an administrator
  • Manage and block websites that your child has access to

While younger children generally will not try and find ways around your internet restrictions, as children get older, they might attempt to get beyond your restrictions if they find them unfair – for example, if you don’t allow them to set up any social media profiles (Facebook, Twitter, myspace, etc) or use chatrooms. So be prepared to enforce and defend your decisions – which is where our second piece of advice comes in handy.

Educate Your Children About The Dangers

The internet is not a safe place – not intrinsically. Sensitive data is not always secure and once something is posted on the internet it’s always going to be there – even if the profile or image is deleted.

Some basic ground rules and dangers to warn your children about might include:

  • Never complete an online profile – don’t give out address, phone number, photos or even their real name.
  • Warn children of people who contact them and and interested in meeting face-to-face.
  • Make sure they know they can (and should) talk to you if anything happens on the internet that makes them feel uncomfortable.

Get Involved

You’re going to want to get involved with your child’s internet experience to make sure that things are safe. Especially with younger children, there are definitely things that may seem innocent to them that may not actually be. Some guidelines for getting involved in your child’s internet experience include:

  • Keeping the computer in a common area.
  • Share an email account with your child – or make sure that you have the password to their email account to monitor for unsolicited emails.
  • Bookmark your child’s favorite sites for easy access.
  • Monitor credit cards and phone bills for unfamiliar charges.
  • Disable “cookies” so that a child can’t inadvertently process a credit card charge because all the necessary data is already stored.

These are some of the most basic things you could (and should) be doing to keep your child and your child’s identity safe on the internet – this is the “don’t take candy from strangers” lesson for the digital era, and you want your children to understand it without having to learn it the hard way.

Alison Waters is a freelance writer who works with a company that offers IT project management and hardware support – so that if you’re a small business owner and your kid inadvertently pulls all the plugs, they could still recover your data. She hopes that no child is the target of an internet predator.

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Ensure Kids’ Safety in School against Offenders

Children in schools face different types of risks. Once the parents drop off their children to school, the local education authority, the teacher, and the school’s administration have the responsibility for their kids’ safety. However, there are also other agencies who can contribute to ensure security such as the fire and police departments, the equipment suppliers, maintenance companies, insurers and social services.

Wellbeing as the School’s Major Responsibility

Image Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/loop_oh/3176885291/

The main security concerns prioritised by schools include the safety of schoolchildren, staff as well as the visitors. Other concerns are those including intrusion of trespassers within the premises, arson, theft and vandalism.

One of the most important aspects for protecting children is placing schools in the position to promote and safeguard the rights and welfare of the children. This means to shield children from any forms of maltreatment, prevent harm on their health and development, and make sure that they are thriving in favourable conditions which are consistent to a healthy growth.

Children’s Security and Safety

The school has the responsibility to children by taking necessary steps to ensure that they do not suffer injury within the school premises. This must be taken into consideration when installing security measures in place. There should be a balance between reinforcing security and allowing the children freedom with putting them at risk.

Installing Fences for Protection

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In installing fences, the fence should be able to protect children from intruders and at the same time, safe enough as not to pose any harm to children playing near it. For instance, the fence should come with anti-climb and anti-cut features so that both intruders and children cannot pass through easily.

The fences should also be durable enough to withstand attempts from intruders to break in and from children playing close by. This is especially true when the fences are installed in the play area or in the school yard. While children are enjoying the warm sun, they are also prone and vulnerable to trespassers and offenders who might be lurking nearby.

Aside from safety measures, precautionary steps should also be taken. Warning signs should be installed to let people know what they should and shouldn’t do. Such signs must not only be understandable by adults but by children as well.

Use of Reasonable Force against Trespassers

School authorities are allowed to use reasonable force to stop and detain those who trespass and those who cause concern to the individuals inside the school. The school staff can do this to offenders or suspected offenders. Arrests can be made even without warrant to those who have committed an “arrestable offence” such as breaking in and trespassing unlawfully.

If the school authority deems it necessary, they can arrest and detain unwanted visitors, as long as there are reasonable circumstances behind this action. On the other and, this will also create a risk on the part of the school authorities when they implement this rule. Therefore, the school should also be aware of its duties and responsibilities to the children and the employees to prevent any harm.

Safe Site Facilities provide security measures, such as steel screens and temporary fencing for a wide range of premises including schools.

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Why You Shouldn’t Friend Your Teen on Facebook

Civil Records

If you have a teenager, you’re probably well-versed in how important the Internet is to the social life of a high schooler. Most teenagers have Facebook accounts and spend many hours per week on the computer. It’s a trend that isn’t going away. You might even have a Facebook page of your own. But does that mean you have to be “friends” with your teenager? Some parents very closely monitor the computer usage of their teenagers and others don’t bother. Where do you fall on the spectrum? A teenager’s Facebook page is a very personal place, and if you’re friends with them, you’ll have access to it. As a parent, you may think it’s a good idea. It’s not. Some things should remain sacred, and your child’s Facebook page is one of them. Under no circumstances should you friend your teenager on Facebook. If you do, you’ll probably end up regretting it very quickly. Here are a few reasons why you shouldn’t go there.

Do You Really Want to Know What They’re Doing?

Teenagers use Facebook to post and comment on all types of teenage things. They’ll post pictures of the weekend parties, talk about relationships, say things they think are “cool,” and much more. Do you really want to be able to see all that? Being able to view your teen’s Facebook page may grant you too high a level of access into their personal life. Many things may not warrant parental intervention, but seeing them may make you uncomfortable.

Do You Really Want to Know What Their Friends are Doing?

Teens use Facebook to communicate with each other all the time. Not only will you have unnecessary access to the comments of your own teenager, you’ll also be viewing the wall posts, status comments and photos of their friends, too. If you’re not ready to see your teenager’s closest buddies in a new light, you shouldn’t be friends with your teen on Facebook.

You’ll Make Them Censor Themselves

If you’re friends with your teen on Facebook, you better believe they’ll censor their page for you. They’ll think twice about everything they post. They’ll first evaluate if it’s something they’re okay with you seeing or not. While it’s a good thing for them to be discerning with what they post, you don’t want to be the sole reason they have to censor themselves. Let your teen be a teen. They’ll be able to enjoy their social networking experience more if you’re not watching so closely.

You’ll Have to Censor Yourself

You’ll also have to make sure your page is appropriate for your teen to see, too. You won’t be able to post anything you don’t want them to see, like things they could make fun of or be upset by. But you have a personal life, too, and you don’t want to censor yourself, either. If you don’t friend your teen, you won’t have to worry about it. You can be yourself and enjoy Facebook without worrying about constantly playing the part of parent and role model.

Terry Ford wants to remind you that Facebook can be fun if you play carefully and always use a Grammar Checker.

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Why Parents Need To Be Careful About Children Watching TV

Civil Records

Most parents are acutely aware of the problems that can result from an over-reliance on the television. Young children can be greatly entertained and intellectually stimulated by the TV, of course, but there’s always a balancing act to be performed. Watching it for too long can harm a child’s development, so it’s always advisable to err on the side of caution.

Children’s TV schedules reveal a healthy smattering of fun-based informative shows, so the youngsters can watch, learn and develop at the same time. However, the networks also incorporate a huge number of cartoons into their listings as well, and this is where problems can occur, both in the short and long terms.

A few cartoons here and there aren’t a problem, of course, and will allow the children to enjoy a little escapism from time to time. However, some parents find it difficult to stop their children from watching TV for hours at a time, and that can lead to significant issues for kids of all ages.

Some of the cartoons are rather too violent for some parents’ liking, so some sort of embargo could be the answer. However, because of the sheer number of channels that are available these days, it’s often difficult to police exactly what the children may be watching. Of course, most cartoon shows are relatively short, so if a parent leaves the room for ten minutes or so it could be too late to make a difference.

What to watch? When to watch?

As children get older, there is often some friction among the family members in regard to what to watch on TV. In the evenings, when work and school commitments are all done for the day, the prospect of three or more people all arguing about viewing arrangements can lead to some serious disagreements.

One solution is to purchase a television for the children’s bedroom or bedrooms. Most youngsters eventually get a set for their rooms, of course, but there is plenty of debate about which is the right age for this to happen. As you might expect, there is no right or wrong answer, and every parent will have their own idea about when the right time would be.

One thing is certain – there is a time when it’s simply too early. Every parent should bear in mind what they were like at that age. If a child has a ready-made opportunity to sit at home and watch television all day long, the chances are that he or she will do just that. It’s far better to leave the ‘TV in the room scenario’ for a few years at least.

There is an enormous selection of TVs on the market these days, so it pays to do a little research before parting with any cash. One major consideration is the size of the screen, because if it’s too large it will dominate the room and could lead to eyesight problems in later life. Thankfully, the choice in stores and on the web is impressive, so the parent should always have a good look around before buying.

 

David Rice is a UK parent who knows how difficult it can be to raise children. He works in the Birmingham car hire business, where he specialises in finding the best car rental Birmingham has to offer.

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Tips On How To Deal With The Teenagers

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Drastic changes happen during adolescent stage and can threaten good relationships. It could be hard for the parents to deal with the changes and sometimes misunderstanding brings separation between the children and the parents. Most of the parents encounter problems due to teenage behaviors and action should be taken soon.

These changes come from physical or hormonal changes. Friends can also be a factor because of the so called peer pressure. Family matter stressors or school problem from strict teachers or isolation from classmates have been the main reasons of unexplained behavior. Problems should be fixed earlier to stop it from getting worst.

Now if you are one of the problematic parents, here are some suggestions for you to easily deal with behaviors:

  1. Make yourself open for a free talk with your child. Making your child discuss concerning his problems will make him feel better and ease.
  2. Involve yourself to the problem. Your child will feel a helping hand and can come to you anytime another problem occurs.
  3. Pass positive behavior and avoid making suggestions. In this way, your child can learn from his own mistakes.
  4. Do not argue things, it can worsen the problem. Instead reward them for the good things they have done in order for them to get motivated. You can also apply selected ignoring for the things that are inevitably wrong.
  5. Sometimes, certain behaviors come from practices such as drug abuse, unsafe sex experimentation, and eating disorders. These situations should be solved earlier to avoid further mistakes someday.
  6. Tackle the problem with complete seriousness to dealt better with his problems.

Dealing with teenage behaviors is uneasy just like adjusting yourself with the fitness program. You need to modify and implement new rules to let things keep going. An advice from Tony Horton or someone who are used to be an expert on dealing with behaviors should be done to solve things early before it turned to bigger problems.

  • Helping Kids Enjoy Camping (fryingpansports.com)
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Internet Safety for Parents: Three Top Tips

Civil Records

Internet safety for parents is something you should not ignore and doesn’t have to be too much of a burden. If you follow our simple steps you can rest assured that your family’s use of the internet will be safe and secure and you can avoid at least one of the many headaches that come with parenting.

Supervision (tip one)

Whilst there are many tools out there to make internet supervision easier for you, children should be supervised 100% of the time when it comes to their digital world. With so many pitfalls around every corner; even the best parental control programs are not able to block every potential area of inquiry so it is worth having the added security of your direct supervision. This is the only real way of guaranteeing 100% internet safety but should be nevertheless done alongside these other options.

Parental control software (tip two)

Parental control software is an absolute wonder for anyone scared of letting their children view the internet for fear of what they might be exposed to. As we’ve mentioned, no software can block 100% of illicit material online but parental control software can block so much adult material from search engines and links that you should definitely invest in it as your first line of defence. Even the most cautious searchers can be exposed to things they’d much rather not uncover.

Talking to your child about the internet (tip three)

This is often the most overlooked but certainly one of the most important of all precautions parents should take. Whilst supervision and software will work, you have to bear in mind that at some stage these ‘parental controls’ will have to be removed. When that happens it is much better if your child is prepared adequately to deal with the internet in a mature and responsible way. A few key areas you should consider covering with your child are:

  • Social networks and social interaction – at a young age this is incredibly important due to the potential risks of online grooming, cyberbullying and sexual predation. As you’re children get older they need to be made aware of appropriate and inappropriate posting, comments and other things. In much the same way as we aim to foster our children’s emotional development, you also need to foster their internet development and having frank and open conversations about these subjects will help.
  • Adult sites and pornography – Once your children are older they are bound to encounter adult material online and to be perfectly honest you really can’t stop this happening unless you remove internet access from them entirely. A better way of discouraging them to engage with this material is to explain the hazards, moral and social problems associated with this kind of material and to honestly talk about the exploitative nature of the content. Many parents will not be comfortable with this but there are 3rd party sources online who can help so don’t be too worried.
  • Browsing safety and downloading – explaining the risks of downloading illegal material, such as games and films containing spy ware and viruses is the best way to ensure that this material is not viewed. However you will need to make your children aware of the alternatives such as iTunes and Spotify so that they are not tempted nonetheless.

These are undoubtedly the best internet safety tips that you should be focusing on. Using all three will help keep your children safe and also help them develop a strong awareness of these online dangers, making them better adapted for use in their adult lives.

 

Jane writes about internet safety for children in order to help raise awareness to parents about the potential dangers of the digital world.

 

 

  • 3 Leading Causes of Childhood Injuries [and Ways to Avoid Them] (SexOffendersSearch.org)
  • Guide to Developing a Diet for Hyperactive Children (detoxcleansing.org)
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